{"slides_column":"2","slides_scroll":"1","dots":"false","arrows":"true","autoplay":"true","autoplay_interval":"5000","loop":"true","rtl":"false","speed":"2000","center_mode":"false"}
Dauphin Kings Neepawa Natives OCN Blizzard Portage Terriers Selkirk Steelers Steinbach Pistons Swan Valley Stampeders Virden Oil Capitals Wayway Wolverines Winkler Flyers Winnipeg Blues Winnipeg Freeze

Alumni Update – Talor Joseph

Goaltender Talor Joseph has been very busy since his junior career ended with the Portage Terriers in 2015. From BC to Sweden and back again. He has his sights set on a career in hockey, whether it’s with his business or playing pro.

Joseph came to the Terriers for the 2013-14 season and posted a sparkling .923 SV% in 32 games. He returned for the National Championship season and started red hot. He had a .932 SV% and a record of 17-1-2. “One of my favourite memories was the winning streak to start the National Championship season,” says Joseph. Unfortunately, he went down with a knee injury and missed out on the rest of the season. “Even though I didn’t get to be on the ice for the win due to injury it was amazing to be a part of it.”

He says his experience in Portage helped him on his journey. “I learned from some of the best coaches in Junior hockey with Blake [Spiller], Paul [Harland], and Jimmy [Tkachyk]. I learned a lot of maturity and a lot of knowledge about the game. Geno will be dearly missed. He meant a lot to me and I was thankful to always come back and visit him on my way to Nipissing.”

“I loved my time in Portage and would recommend it to anyone including my younger brother. The billet families were a huge part of my time there and were great. The whole organization felt like family.”

“After the Terriers I had some DI options but there was uncertainty with my knee injury,” says Joseph. “I played a season (four games) for Grant MacEwan University (ACAC) as I healed from my injury. I was looking to transfer and decided to go to Nipissing University.”

It wasn’t a simple transition to CIS hockey for Joseph. “That summer before Nipissing I got hit by a drunk driver and had a concussion and some pretty bad injuries. I was out for three months which also set back my career.”

Over 3 seasons he was able to get between the pipes for 28 games and had his best numbers in 2018-19 with a .939 SV%. Joseph finished his undergrad at Nipissing and had one year left of eligibility so he transferred to Trinity Western in Langley, BC for his MBA. He was unable to start his season this year due to COVID-19 but got an opportunity to hit the ice overseas.

“I went to Sweden in summer for a pro tryout with my brother who finished last year in the WHL,” says Joseph. “My plan was always to come home but it was an unreal experience. It was like junior times 10. You get to do hockey for a living.”

He talks about his schedule in Sweden. “We would wake up and go to the rink, have a sauna, get some free meals, have practice and then workout. It was like junior but with more perks and of course getting paid. I wasn’t able to get paid because it would mess up my college eligibility, but It was cool to experience what that lifestyle is like.”

After finishing his MBA Joseph hopes to put his degree to good use. “I’m taking my time through my MBA because I have a lot going on. I am doing an internship with a marketing company in Langley and I am in the process of starting a hockey related business.”

“Our company name is Limitless Ice Solutions. We are going to create Limitless Ice Performance Centres. We are going to revolutionize the way players train. We will have everything in one shop for parents. Access to quality ice and training equipment along with a chiropractor, physiotherapist and nutritionist. I am fortunate to be a part of a group that is working on that. We hope to launch this summer.”

He doesn’t want to focus solely on the business yet. He still has a dream to keep playing. “The plan after my degree is to try and play pro hockey. I still have the dream of playing in the NHL some day, so anything in North America would be great. Starting in the AHL or the ECHL and work my way up would be ideal, but I’d be happy to play pro anywhere.”